jobs

Work

How are jobs - and workers - changing? Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee discuss which robots we should fear, and which we shouldn't. New York Times columnist Tom Friedman weighs in on the future of work. Plus, we may be heading for a 32-hour work week, and find out why money doesn’t make us as happy as we think. Read More...

Asleep at computer

Employers are starting to use technology to hire, track and promote employees - in unprecedented ways. Read More...

Pile of Cash

Dave Girouard, former Google executive and founder of Upstart, has a radical - and controversial - solution for young people burdened with student loans. Read More...

How is the shift from an industrial to an innovation economy affecting you? In "The Rise of the Creative Class," Richard Florida examines how we are inventing new forms of work. Read More...

City

Richard Florida describes workers being priced out of selective cities. Credit: Nicoze / Flickr Creative Commons

Richard Florida, "Rise of the Creative Class" author, disagrees with Tom Friedman's argument that the world is becoming "flat."

factory floor

What if automation, robotics, and artificial intelligence are bearing down on us at a faster rate than we ever anticipated? Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson, authors of "The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies," say technology is rapidly reshaping our economy. Read more...

cool tools

Kevin Kelly, co-founder of Wired magazine and author of "Cool Tools," says that robots are getting better and better at doing human jobs – and that's a good thing. Read more...

American workers, 1945

In our continuing series on American competitiveness - and whether America will still be the place where great innovation occurs - we’ve looked at transportation with Former Governor Ed Rendell and education with Professor Paul Peterson and former Assistant Secretary of Education Chester Finn. Today we ask: how desirable are American workers? And is that desirability threatened by gridlock in Washington? Read more...

Our Disappearing Jobs

If you were to travel back in time 20 or 30 years and tell the first person you saw that machines in the future could read your checks, deposit them, and dispense exactly the amount of money you needed whenever you needed it, you probably would get a few raised eyebrows. Yet, how many times have you visited an ATM in the past month instead of a human bank teller? In a new controversial study from Oxford University, researchers Michael Osborne and Carl Frey argue that this kind of automation is only the beginning. They predict that in the next twenty years an astounding 47 percent of American jobs may become automated.

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