Marching forward. Credit: Daniel G. / Flickr Creative Commons

1. Silicon Valley used to be fruit orchards. That was, until one man – Gordon Moore – realized that transistors get faster and cheaper every year. And the rest is iPhone and Facebook history.

2. Negotiating for higher pay doesn't mean having to put on the proverbial battle armor. Stanford's Margaret Ann Neale tells us what really works when you're trying to get your way.

3. We have the Six Million Dollar Man to thank for our advances in medicine. Steven Kotler, author of "Tomorrowland: Our Journey from Science Fiction to Science Fact," explains how books, movies and television have dreamed up advances in technology before anyone knew how to make them happen.

We all owe a big ‘thanks’ to Gordon Moore. Fifty years after he predicted an exponential rise in computing power – a theory known as Moore’s Law – Chancellor of the Chemical Heritage Foundation Arnold Thackray gives us a glimpse into the life of the visionary. Read More...

A mosquito, transmitter of malaria. Credit: Enrique Dans / Flickr Creative Commons

If GMOs in your grocery cart caused a stir, what will happen when they're buzzing around your own backyard? KPBS in San Diego’s David Wagner says get ready for the next big step in genetic rewiring: wild flies and mosquitos. Read More...

Two people negotiate at a market. Credit: Barney Moss / Flickr Creative Commons

You can’t always get what you want – or can you? Stanford Business School professor Margaret Ann Neale argues that you can negotiate successfully; it just takes a little help from science. Read More...

A fedora. Credit: davidd / Flickr Creative Commons

As any Mad Men fan knows, the once-trendy fedoras that men sported were hung up the second they entered the office. Author and entrepreneur Nir Eyal wants that habit to come back in style – this time, with our iPhones. Read More...

Science fiction Star Trek paintings. Credit: James Vaughan / Flickr Creative Commons

The gizmos we gawk at in Star Trek and Blade Runner still seem light-years away. But the rapid growth in computing power may have put us on a fast track. Science journalist Steven Kotler tells us why it’s time to start saving up for that flying car. Read More...

Saturn illustrates how no negotiation drives up prices. Credit: Anne Wardwell / Flickr Creative Commons

For women in business, Reddit’s new anti-negotiation policy might seem like a step in the right direction. But Stanford professor Margaret Ann Neale insists otherwise. Read More...

A complicated mess of machinery. Credit: Gigi C. / Flickr Creative Commons

1. Technology is doing more than destroying our attention spans. Middlebury’s Jason Mittell says that your Netflix binges might actually be driving a shift to better storytelling.

2. In 75 years you'll be vacationing in outer space, at least according to Arizona State Professor Jim Bell. A century ago, widespread worldwide travel was laughable; now you can sip a Diet Coke while whizzing over the ocean on an airplane with Wi-Fi. Bell explains why you might be able to book a space hotel sooner than you think.

3.  Seat belts don't always save lives. Indirectly, their effectiveness has put a huge strain on the market for organs, by keeping more young, healthy donors alive as waitlists swell. As strange as it sounds, Northeastern law professor Kara Swanson explains why a legal organ market could solve our current shortage.

A pile of remote controls. Credit: Redjar / Flickr Creative Commons

The idea of turning a knob to change a channel has gone the way of the dinosaurs. But today’s point-and-click comfort didn’t arrive overnight. We can thank Eugene Polley and his enormous Flash-Matic for getting the ball rolling in 1955. Read More...

An x-ray of a human head. Credit: Rudolf Vlcek / Flickr Creative Commons

Do we know our bodies’ true value? Northeastern's Kara Swanson says the massive gap between organ supply and demand makes it much higher than we might think. Read More...

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