The Pantheon stands the test of time.

The Burj Khalifa might be the tallest building in the world, but is it the most advanced? MIT Professor John Ochsendorf thinks that today’s architects should take a page from classical structures. Read More...

Looking towards the future.

1. Hospitals in the South were desegregated thanks to Medicare. Jennifer Klein, professor of history at Yale, lets us in on Medicare's bumpy, challenging backstory.

2. Access to cell phones won't banish poverty. That's according to author - and former Microsoft exec - Kentaro Toyama, who explains why technology is not always the answer.

3. In politics, owning an Island is still better than owning a computer. Micah Sifry, co-founder of Personal Democracy Media, expains why technology hasn't lived up to its promise - and why he's still hopeful.

Toyama says students are a little too used to tech.

Computer scientist Kentaro Toyama used to use tech to help the poor around he world. But slowly, he started believing it wasn't the answer. He explains why tech isn't doing much to educate the underprivileged or spur social change. Read More...

Happy 50th birthday to Medicare.

As Medicare turns 50, Yale Professor Jennifer Klein explains how the social program changed America - and why it almost didn’t happen. Read More...

Some old-fashioned ballot casting.

The Internet was supposed to revolutionize democracy and make government more responsive.; so far, that hasn’t really happened. Author Micah Sifry tells us what went wrong, and what could still go right. Read More...

One screen isn't enough for today's employees.

Ever feel like you’re still at work, long after you’ve left the office? Well, you’re not alone. Professor Ian Bogost argues we live in a “hyper employed” time, and offers some ideas for what we can do about it. Read More...

Something exciting is coming.

1. Online retailers might charge you a few dollars more for those pants, if they think you can afford it. Dan Mongan, co-author of "All You Can Pay," explains that companies are increasingly using our data to tailor prices. 

2. The idea that you could forecast the weather came about at the same time as another controversial theory: evolution. Author Peter Moore tells the tale of the men who dared to predict storms, and their connection to Charles Darwin.

3. Laptops of the future will know that you're stressed. Rosalind Picard of MIT has been working to make smarter computers that anticipate our needs, and she says that future is closer than you think.

Robots are getting emotional.

In science-fiction, you’ll encounter a lot of computers that can feel... HAL 9000, Deckard, WALL-E. But what about computers that can really sense your emotions? MIT Professor Rosalind Picard takes a look at this artificial-feeling future. Read More...

A 19th century weather map.

Before the 1800s, our climate was unpredictable, poorly understood, and frightening. Author Peter Moore gives us the untold story of a generation of maverick scientists who finally let us predict the weather. Read More...

Analyzing our digital relationships.

What if you could learn about your relationship by examining big data? Statistician Emma Pierson did just that, by combing through all the emails she and her boyfriend had sent each other over the years. She found some… interesting data points. Read More...

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