Culture

Advertisements in Times Square, NYC

The days of passive consumers are long gone. If advertisers want to engage today’s audiences, they need to create shareable experiences, say Thinkmodo co-founder James Percelay and advertising professor Edward Boches. Read More...

The Great Depression, World War II, 9/11 — the New Yorker has published through all of it. David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, looks at what the future holds — and why print’s not dead. Read more...

New Yorker wallpaper
Cooking and fire

If you want cutting edge cuisine, try deer leg aged in beeswax. Corby Kummer, senior editor at The Atlantic, talks about the big food trends we’ll see in 2015 — and how the work of the world’s most creative chefs filters down the rest of us. Read More...

Love and Balloons

Love may be a battlefield, but Christian Rudder of OkCupid and Pepper Schwartz of Perfect Match think that online dating is changing the entire war. Read More...

Information overload can be a problem

We’ve suffered from information overload for years. But Wall Street Journal social media editor Sarah Marshall sees a future with a finishable news experience. Read More...

Gazing into the future

Matthew Drinkwater, head of the Fashion Innovation Agency, and Ryan Raffaelli, assistant professor at Harvard Business School discuss the history – and future – of fashion and technology. Read More...

Eiffel Tower

Visit the Eiffel Tower, the White House, and even the city of Venice – all by traveling to China. Technology writer Clive Thompson argues that these copies echo deeply-rooted Chinese beliefs, but are also a way to innovate. Read More...

woman scientist

Ten years ago, Larry Summers made some remarks on the lack of women in math and science – and it created an uproar. Author and professor Eileen Pollack was so outraged, she began to research for answers. Read More...

clothes

Thanks to customizable data, fashion startup Stitch Fix makes your closet look more like a Netflix queue. Read More...

A glowing laptop

Our most precious resources are dwindling, but author Robert Bryce suggests that breakthrough technologies will actually improve the environment – and continue to make peoples’ lives better. Read More...

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