Sci and Tech

There aren't that many jobs like this

If you’ve got an engineering degree, you’re pretty much set for life, right? Well, that might not be the whole picture, according to Professor of Public Policy Hal Salzman, who argues that there’s entirely too many STEM graduates. And we get a peek at what the STEM job market is truly like, from a roundtable of students and recent graduates. Read More...

Elevator going up

There’s an invention that’s made the modern metropolis possible. No, it’s not the automobile or steel. It’s the elevator. Tom Sybert, host of the Elevator Radio Show, explains how the elevator completely transformed how we live. Read More...

Camels shaped the trade industry

From the invention of the wheel to that $5 shirt you bought at H&M, what would your life look like without trade? Author William Bernstein explains how trade gave rise to the world as we know it. Read More...

Science is in a rut, according to Roberta Ness

Is science in a rut? Professor Roberta Ness thinks so, and she wants institutions and the government to start funding more risky, out-there projects. Read More...

Snackbot

Vending machines that ask trivia questions and give out electronics. Take a peek at the new world of interactive advertisements. Read More...

Girl working on computer

Anthropologist Mimi Ito explains how the rise of online learning might actually increase the educational divide between rich and poor. Read More...

Grand Canyon with colors

Climate change, megacities, ocean acidification. Author Diane Ackerman believes humans have shaped the world so much that we’re now living in a new geologic epoch, one that’s defined by our actions. Read More...

flirting computers

Stanford researchers studied how men and women talk when they’re flirting, and Melissa Dahl, a writer for New York Magazine, discovered that — so far — your computer’s better at it than you. Read More...

highlighting a schedule

It can take dozens of back-and-forth emails just to set up a quick meeting. Now, an artificial intelligence personal assistant can do it for you. Dennis Mortensen, CEO of x.ai, explains why you shouldn’t be afraid. Read More...

popcorn

Inventor Percy Spencer originally worked on radars for Raytheon, but his discovery – and subsequent experiments – produced a household appliance that changed the way we consume food. Read More...

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