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A week after the University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees approved a three percent tuition hike, UMass President Marty Meehan says the university is looking to cut costs and increase efficiency.

Responding to student activists who say divestment from fossil fuel companies would address global climate change, administrators at the University of Massachusetts are pledging to advocate for divestment.

Wednesday was former Congressman Marty Meehan’s first day on the job as president of the University of Massachusetts. He's the system's 27th president, but its first graduate to lead the university. Meehan spent his first day meeting with students.

It was almost impossible to escape the call for Massachusetts to “be great” during the campaign of now-Governor Charlie Baker last fall. The campaign slogan followed Baker right to a Yankee Candle facility in Whatley this May, where the company presented him with a specially branded “Let’s Be Great Massachusetts” jar.

But for Massachusetts to truly be great, the Commonwealth has to stop underfunding its public higher education system, starting with UMass.

Students at any one of the University of Massachusetts’ five campuses may have to pay more in tuition next year. The UMass Board of Trustees is recommending an increase of up to 5 percent for in-state undergrads. It would be the first tuition and fee increase in two years.

The University of Massachusetts has selected its next president: former congressman Marty Meehan. Meehan will become the first UMass graduate to lead the system, and he’ll face a unique set of challenges.

And then there were two. The University of Massachusetts is one step closer to choosing its next president, as a presidential search committee has named two finalists: UMass-Lowell Chancellor Marty Meehan and Harvard business professor John Quelch.

On Thursday at the University of Massachusetts Boston, higher education leaders met with Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren to discuss ways to control the cost of college and help students graduate with less debt. WGBH's Kirk Carapezza was there:

Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland also attended yesterday's event. Listen to Kirk's extended interview with him and Senator Warren. 

Days after announcing it would ban Iranian international students from certain graduate degree courses, the University of Massachusetts Amherst has reversed its policy, saying it will accept them into science and engineering programs.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst has banned Iranian international students from enrolling in certain graduate programs, including engineering and natural sciences. UMass says its policy is dictated by U.S. sanctions against Iran, citing a federal law - the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012. Still, some academics argue the policy goes too far and the university may be discriminating against Iranians.

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