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If you had the opportunity, would you attend a college that sends you around the world to live in world-class cities while taking all of your classes online? The Minerva Project is a university that is raising eyebrows with its non-traditional approach.

A trial run of new online tests in Massachusetts has received mixed reviews from the state’s educators. Although some school district officials say they’re confident they’ll be able to handle the shift to computer-based testing if it becomes mandatory in two years, others worry that technical problems on the local level will make the results meaningless.

In March and May, nearly 70,000 randomly selected students in Massachusetts took the new tests, which are meant to be aligned with Common Core standards now in place in 43 states. Hundreds of thousands of other students in 13 other states were also part of the trial run of the exam, which is known as PARCC, for the multi-state consortium that designed it, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers.

Traditionally, college students earn credit for how many hours they spend in a classroom. But a different approach gives credit based on how much you know -- and know how to do. As the cost of college soars, proponents say competency-based education could save students and employers thousands.

The demand for computer science majors is booming. Even at traditionally liberal arts institutions, students who want to learn how to code are flocking to colleges and universities. It's almost hard to believe that the field wasn't even considered a real major back in the 1960s. 

In Cambridge this week, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is celebrating 50 years of computing and the birth of a new field.

Despite ongoing tense relations between Iran and the United States, the Obama administration is encouraging a unique partnership between the two countries. A new policy is meant to promote educational exchanges and, for the first time, will allow Iranian students to access U.S. courses online. 

One of the world's most prestigious business schools is going digital. After much anticipation, Harvard Business School is launching its first online learning initiative.

You might be one of millions of people around the world who have signed up for a massive open online course, or MOOC, the question is: did you walk away before it was over? Study after study shows only a small percentage of students, or participants, complete these courses. Despite low completion rates researchers at MIT and Harvard insist that MOOCs still have value.

Hackers have stolen the personal information of  students, faculty, staff and alumni from the University of Maryland. The university says hackers seized Social Security numbers of 309,079 people, and the cause of the security breach is under investigation. This comes as security experts worry future cyber attacks are increasingly likely to come through college and university networks.

First there was Target. Then high-end retailer Neiman Marcus. Now, security experts say future cyber attacks are likely to come through college and university networks — networks that tend to have big, broad Internet pipes, with less protection.

A new survey shows the number of college students taking at least one online course has surpassed 7.1 million. But the report conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group finds the rate of growth in online enrollment has actually slowed in recent years.

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