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Colleges and universities across the country are scrambling to deal with President Trump’s temporary travel ban on citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries linked to concerns about terrorism.

Labor economists at Georgetown University are out with their own rankings of more than 1,400 colleges and universities based on graduates’ earnings potential. The report, Ranking Your College: Where You Go and What You Make, gives students and families a list of colleges with the highest earnings potential ten years after students enroll.

Three years ago, Harvard University and MIT embarked on a unique experiment when they launched a nonprofit called edX. The start-up promised a free online education, with university-level classes for anyone living anywhere across the globe.

Admission and rejection letters are in. Now, high school seniors are tearing their hair out, trying to decide which college to put down a deposit on by the looming May 1 deadline. One factor that weighs heavily on parents and students' minds: how elite a school is. 

MIT scientists are presenting a report Monday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science that describes what they call America’s growing innovation deficit.

A new MIT-Harvard study released Wednesday finds nearly 40 percent of learners who take open online courses are teachers. That finding has researchers wondering whether they can better design online courses once predicted to upend students' experience to meet teachers' needs.

Last year, WGBH's On Campus reported that despite low completion rates researchers at MIT and Harvard insist that online courses still have value:

While most colleges and universities notify admitted students with a letter or email, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is imagining a world in which students are notified by drone.

In an unprecedented broad-based survey, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology polled students about their attitudes and experiences with sexual assault on campus. One in six female undergraduate students who responded to the survey say they've experienced sexual assault on the Cambridge campus, although fewer than 5 percent reported the experience to authorities or to the school.


The buzz around open online courses - often free and occasionally for credit - is fading. But as tuition prices and student debt soar, online learning continues to grow. One of the largest providers of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, is Harvard and MIT's edX. Some 2.5 million people have signed up for these classes, ranging from the Introduction to Computer Science to The Ancient Greek Hero.

So what do most students get for completing one of these courses? New knowledge and maybe a certificate of completion, but no credit. WGBH’s On Campus caught up with a student-researcher who predicts colleges and universities will soon offer some form of credit for MOOCs.

The demand for computer science majors is booming. Even at traditionally liberal arts institutions, students who want to learn how to code are flocking to colleges and universities. It's almost hard to believe that the field wasn't even considered a real major back in the 1960s. 

In Cambridge this week, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is celebrating 50 years of computing and the birth of a new field.

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