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Colleges and universities across the country are scrambling to deal with President Trump’s temporary travel ban on citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries linked to concerns about terrorism.

Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo wants to waive tuition for in-state college students. Her plan would offer two years tuition-free regardless of family income. Raimondo says higher education must be more affordable and accessible and she wants Rhode Island's public colleges to be among the first to go tuition-free and subsidize all mandatory fees.

The U.S. Education Department is creating a new office to protect federal student loan borrowers and to investigate scams in higher education. It sounds like something out of a Law & Order episode: the Student Aid Enforcement Unit. Among other things, the $13.6 million unit will probe schools that lie to prospective students about their graduation and job rates.

Strike up the band, two of the country's most prestigious performing arts colleges - Berklee College of Music and the Boston Conservatory - have agreed to merge. So far, it's one of the more high-profile mergers in higher education.

Pointed questions, impatient follow-ups and testy retorts rang through the Supreme Court Wednesday as the future of affirmative action in college admissions was debated with intensity.

Boston-based startup Gradifi is asking employers to help their employees pay back their students loans, and some firms are responding. More than a hundred businesses have lined up for a chance to help their workers pay down their crushing debt.

Marty Meehan will be formally installed as the 27th President of the University of Massachusetts on Thursday. The former congressman and University of Massachusetts Lowell Chancellor will present his vision for the university’s future during his inauguration ceremony at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate.

More than half of all community college students need to take developmental courses in math or English before starting their two-year degrees. So some schools are trying something different to prevent these students from dropping out.

For many of the hundreds of thousands of students attending community college in the United States, focusing solely on school is not an option. According to the results of a WGBH News polls, 70 percent of students enrolled in community college are also working - many of them full-time. In response, community colleges are trying to provide the right support for working students who struggle to stay afloat.

Community colleges have long operated in the shadows of more expensive, elite four-year colleges, but worries about the cost of college are now drawing students to these two-year programs. A new survey by WGBH News shows Americans believe strongly that community colleges are essential to providing families with opportunities.


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