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Massachusetts lawmakers are eyeing a bill that would make community colleges tuition-free for some in-state students. The bill got a hearing before the Legislature's Joint Committee on Higher Education on Wednesday.

Simmons College is moving four of its graduate degree programs online, including the nation’s only MBA designed specifically for women.

Despite the high cost of college in this country, most Americans will choose to go to school here. But there is a growing number of students who are getting their degrees in other countries, like Germany, where their taxpayers pick up the tab. WGBH's On Campus team recently traveled to Cologne to explore this higher ed defection, and the implications for the United States.

Days after announcing it would ban Iranian international students from certain graduate degree courses, the University of Massachusetts Amherst has reversed its policy, saying it will accept them into science and engineering programs.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst has banned Iranian international students from enrolling in certain graduate programs, including engineering and natural sciences. UMass says its policy is dictated by U.S. sanctions against Iran, citing a federal law - the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012. Still, some academics argue the policy goes too far and the university may be discriminating against Iranians.

report released by the Massachusetts Business Alliance for Education (MBAE) Thursday shows the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) does not indicate a student’s preparedness for post-high school success, and lacks  "alignment with college and career expectations.”

The burn-out rate for teachers in this country is high, nearly half leave the profession within five years. That doesn't come without consequences, American schools are falling behind. On Campus takes a look at what it would take to better prepare teachers, beginning in an unlikely place.

Boston is one of four US cities – along with Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. – vying to host the 2024 Summer Olympics.  Business and civic leaders planning the effort tout the benefits and rosy forecasts – increased global stature for Boston, economic boom in jobs and revenue for local business before, during and after the games, and improved infrastructure and facilities, etc.  The price tag? Recent analysis by The Boston Globe pegs it at approximately $15 billion. 

But here’s another idea altogether: to spur similar investment and excitement in Boston and other cities for education by borrowing this same blueprint. 

A record number of American college students are studying abroad - 289,000, according to the most recent data released Monday by the Institute of International Education.

Educators say that’s good, since international education promotes critical relationship building and cross cultural understanding. But many in the field worry the influx of technology and social media may be hampering the ability of American students to fully immerse themselves abroad.

Traditional colleges and universities face a host of challenges: rising costs, skyrocketing student debt and, increasingly, shifting demographics. In New England, the number of high school graduates will decrease in the next two decades, and at risk, higher ed experts say, are high-priced, four-year liberal-arts institutions, schools like Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts.

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