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global competitiveness

Three years ago, sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa found that college students learn little while in school. Their book, Academically Adrift, shocked the academy and provoked angry responses. Now, the two provocateurs are back. Their sequel is calledAspiring Adults AdriftIt follows the same students after graduation and concludes that schools focus on social life rather than academics, and that levies a high tariff on young adults. WGBH's On Campus recently sat down with Arum, and asked him why he wanted to track these young adults as they attempt to enter the working world.

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It's summer break, and for many college students, that means a dive into real work experience through internships. That can mean anything from boring days answering phones, to exciting opportunities leading to future employment. At WGBH's On Campus, we were curious about how college students approach internships today, so we asked our own intern to do some research.

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At a time when more students are going straight to college without any work experience, there’s pressure to get that experience through internships. To get a better sense of the rise of the internship, WGBH'sOn Campus spoke with Anthony Carnevale, director of Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce

International students are enrolling in American colleges in huge numbers, boosting the U.S. economy with tuition dollars and diversifying classrooms. But many of those students don't end up staying and working. Critics say that's because the U.S. isn't handing out enough work visas, which sends these talented grads home. 

Growing up in Colombia, Felipe Spinel got a bachelor's degree and then worked for ten years in Bogota's struggling tech sector, saving enough money to study abroad. In 2010, Spinel was accepted into Boston University's two-year MBA program.

It's eight in the morning, and Debra Zhang is heading to work. She grabs her keys and umbrella, slips on her shoes, and steps on to Boylston Street in Boston's Fenway neighborhood.

Zhang is one of the more than 800,000 international students that attended American colleges and universities last year -- more than 46,000 of them in Massachusetts. And schools are expecting a spike this fall. This trend has implications both for international and domestic students.

Where you go to college may not matter as much as how you study while you’re there.

That's according to a Gallup poll released this week. Gallup and Purdue University announced a new effort to measure career and life outcomes for graduates.

Massachusetts is adopting a plan to make civics part of the curriculum at state colleges. The statewide policy is the first of its kind in the United States.

The new policy proposed by the Board of Higher Education encourages colleges to track civic engagement -- things like understanding the countries' history, government and founding documents. 

Freshmen in David Nurenberg’s honors English course were spending their Monday morning analyzing the ending to “Oedipus the King.” For an hour, students theorized about why Oedipus would blind himself with his mother’s brooch and debated who, if anyone, was at fault in the famous Greek tragedy. One student dissected the play’s prophecy and another compared Oedipus to Lenny in “Of Mice and Men.”

It was the kind of discussion that some at Concord-Carlisle High School initially feared would become a rarity when Massachusetts adopted the Common Core State Standards, a nationally developed set of math and English language arts standards designed to prepare all students for college or the workforce.

Tom Friedman says college education is heading for a "huge disruption."  The New York Times columnist sat down with Innovation Hub host Kara Miller to talk jobs, education and the middle class.

But if you really only care about the education bits, we've got you covered. Here's our listener's guide to the interview.

The debate that's happening in this country about the value of a college degree often centers around job preparation. A new poll out Tuesday from Northeastern University finds business leaders think few recent graduates have the skills to be good workers.

The poll paints a rather bleak picture, out of 800 business leaders polled nationally, 73 percent said there's a shortage of necessary skills in the American workforce.

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