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confronting cost

The cost of college is a hot topic around kitchen tables and on the campaign trail. But will it remain a top issue a year from now, when it's time for Americans to vote for a new president? A new WGBH News poll indicates there’s increased interest now, but history tells us other themes will probably surpass it in the general election.

Just this week some undocumented immigrant students in Massachusetts were made eligible for a prestigious state scholarship at four-year public schools. Immigration advocates welcome that development, but say much more needs to be done. Most undocumented students, including those who attend the state's community colleges, are still not eligible for financial aid.

About a quarter of the students who attend community college in the U.S. come from immigrant backgrounds. They face the same challenges as their non-immigrant classmates but they also experience a different set of struggles, related to language, culture, and helping their families navigate life in a new land.

As part of our weeklong series on community colleges, "College Material," host of WGBH's Greater Boston Jim Braude weighs in on whether community colleges should be free. 

Community colleges have long operated in the shadows of more expensive, elite four-year colleges, but worries about the cost of college are now drawing students to these two-year programs. A new survey by WGBH News shows Americans believe strongly that community colleges are essential to providing families with opportunities.

A new survey from WGBH News finds that the majority of Americans would recommend two-year community colleges over a four-year program to high school students borrowing for college.

Sports programs have traditionally served as a way to get more low-income students on the path to college. But many students are being priced out of those opportunities early on.

Since the Great Recession, postponing retirement is becoming more common in some professions, including higher education. A new survey shows two thirds of college professors now plan to work past the age of 67. That trend comes with serious consequences.

If you’ve been on a college campus lately, you might have noticed a few amenities - fancy welcome centers, golf courses, and saunas. Of course, these things cost money and therefore tuition and fees. But are they responsible for rising tuition?

As students are increasingly stressed about their finances, debt-free college is all the rage. Politicians are using the concept as an attractive campaign platform, but critics say it makes more sense in theory than in practice.

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