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Entries in On Campus by Kirk Carapezza

With tuition and fees on the rise, a poll from Monmouth University finds a majority of Americans think higher education is spending too much time and money on sports. Perhaps no one knows that better than Mark Schlissel, president of the University of MichiganWGBH’s On Campus recently sat down with Schlissel for a rare one-on-one interview and asked him how big-time college sports impact the bottom line and identity of a major research university.

In schools across the country, it is testing season – an anxiety-provoking time for parents, students and teachers. This year, there’s a new twist to the old stress: beginning Monday about 220,000 Massachusetts students will take a new standardized test – one that is designed to better assess new standards set by the state.

Students expelled from the University of Oklahoma after they were caught on video singing a blatant racist song have hired a high-profile lawyer, keeping their legal options open. But are the students being exploited?

While most colleges and universities notify admitted students with a letter or email, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is imagining a world in which students are notified by drone.

For the first time, one of this country's top-ranked women's colleges will accept transgender women students. Wellesley College will consider applications from any candidate who "identifies as a woman."

The new film The Hunting Ground looks at the so-called rape epidemic on college campuses, and how colleges contribute to the issue by deliberately silencing victims, overturning the convictions of rapists, and erasing the truth about how often assaults happen.

Days after announcing it would ban Iranian international students from certain graduate degree courses, the University of Massachusetts Amherst has reversed its policy, saying it will accept them into science and engineering programs.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst has banned Iranian international students from enrolling in certain graduate programs, including engineering and natural sciences. UMass says its policy is dictated by U.S. sanctions against Iran, citing a federal law - the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012. Still, some academics argue the policy goes too far and the university may be discriminating against Iranians.

From UMass Boston to Vermont’s Champlain College, institutes of higher education are trying to boost the number of graduates in a field that barely existed ten years ago: cyber security. And colleges and universities are scrambling to keep up with increased cyber security threats.

For nearly six years, Andrew Card had a desk just outside the Oval Office. Today, the man who served as chief of staff under President George W. Bush is going back to college, as the fifth president of Franklin Pierce University.

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