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Harvard President Drew Gilpin Faust is offering to meet with student activists and environmentalists if they end their blockade of her office and stop disrupting university business.

For the past five days, the student-led group Divest Harvard has been blocking Massachusetts Hall, Harvard’s oldest building, demanding the university sell off fossil fuel stocks in its $36 billion endowment. The goal, organizers say, is to address climate change.

The U.S. Education Department has fined the for-profit giant Corinthian Colleges $30 million for recruiting students with inaccurate job placement rates.

Having universities divest from fossil fuels is a feel-good measure that would do nothing to address the problem of global climate change. Instead, we should be focusing on efforts to push for strong government action.

Many universities hold large endowments that have significant positions in fossil fuel companies or funds that hold fossil fuel assets. But universities also support most of the research that has identified the existence, nature and consequences of climate change, and the principal purpose of the university is to educate, particularly the young adults who will live and work in the climate of the future.

While only 22 U.S. colleges and universities have actually agreed to sell their shares in oil and coal companies, more than 50 have committed themselves to efficiency projects on campus through a special financing method called green revolving funds, including Harvard University.

At Harvard Tuesday morning, environmentalists and student activists expanded their blockade of Massachusetts Hall, blocking University Hall. The protesters are demanding Harvard sell off fossil fuel stocks in its $36 billion endowment. Today, WGBH's Kirk Carapezza explains why divestment is not so easy and how colleges are trying to foster a sensible conversation about climate change.

Students woke up Monday morning on the ground outside of Harvard University's oldest building. They had spent the night there, protesting the university's choice to invest part of its endowment in fossil-fuel companies.

Steve Coll, the dean of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, has published a comprehensive report on a Rolling Stone story about a brutal gang rape at the University of Virginia. The report finds the magazine fell short on multiple counts, citing faulty reporting, editing and fact checking. It’s a bad day for journalism, but Columbia and other colleges and universities are hoping the 12,000-word report shows why journalism schools still matter today.

On Thursday at the University of Massachusetts Boston, higher education leaders met with Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren to discuss ways to control the cost of college and help students graduate with less debt. WGBH's Kirk Carapezza was there:

Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland also attended yesterday's event. Listen to Kirk's extended interview with him and Senator Warren. 

A new MIT-Harvard study released Wednesday finds nearly 40 percent of learners who take open online courses are teachers. That finding has researchers wondering whether they can better design online courses once predicted to upend students' experience to meet teachers' needs.

Last year, WGBH's On Campus reported that despite low completion rates researchers at MIT and Harvard insist that online courses still have value:

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