► LISTEN NOW
DONATE
SEARCH
Choose a Category  

The Common Core was rolled out with the promise of raising expectations for American students and closing both the persistent learning gap and the achievement gap, as measured by test scores. But in the short term, at least, the achievement gap will almost certainly grow wider.

With tuition and fees on the rise, a poll from Monmouth University finds a majority of Americans think higher education is spending too much time and money on sports. Perhaps no one knows that better than Mark Schlissel, president of the University of MichiganWGBH’s On Campus recently sat down with Schlissel for a rare one-on-one interview and asked him how big-time college sports impact the bottom line and identity of a major research university.

In schools across the country, it is testing season – an anxiety-provoking time for parents, students and teachers. This year, there’s a new twist to the old stress: beginning Monday about 220,000 Massachusetts students will take a new standardized test – one that is designed to better assess new standards set by the state.

Even though it's been weeks since a major snowstorm, New England’s college campuses still lay buried under a deep layer of snow and it doesn't look like it will disappear before Opening Day at Fenway. The weather, though, hasn’t deterred prospective students from taking campus tours in Boston.

Students expelled from the University of Oklahoma after they were caught on video singing a blatant racist song have hired a high-profile lawyer, keeping their legal options open. But are the students being exploited?

While most colleges and universities notify admitted students with a letter or email, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is imagining a world in which students are notified by drone.

For the first time, one of this country's top-ranked women's colleges will accept transgender women students. Wellesley College will consider applications from any candidate who "identifies as a woman."

In the final part of our series on German higher education, WGBH's On Campus reports on Germany’s tracking system, where kids are divided up by ability at a young age. The system seems to work well in Germany, but would face strong opposition in the United States.



Employers in America are having a crisis in confidence when it comes to college graduates and their preparation for the workplace. The latest Gallup poll shows only 11 percent of U.S. business leaders ‘strongly agree’ college graduates have the skills they need to succeed. That’s why our On Campus team traveled to Germany, where a different approach to higher education is yielding strong results.

Despite the high cost of college in this country, most Americans will choose to go to school here. But there is a growing number of students who are getting their degrees in other countries, like Germany, where their taxpayers pick up the tab. WGBH's On Campus team recently traveled to Cologne to explore this higher ed defection, and the implications for the United States.

Filter view by:
1 of 29