television

television

We take a dip into history and explore the story of the man whose use of tech changed television forever. Read more...

A room filled with static.

The Internet might have killed the music industry, and that quaint little neighborhood bookstore. But writer Michael Wolff says television is safe, at least for now. Read More...

Television on the beach. Credit: xan lyons / Flickr Creative Commons

We’ve all heard the age old complaint: hundreds of shows, but nothing to watch. Author and Professor of Media Jason Mittell explains why that disgruntled channel-flipping is becoming a thing of the past — and how today's television just keeps getting better. Read More...

Nielsen sheet

TV shows live and die by Nielsen ratings, but does their data still matter in a Netflix world? It all depends on advertisers, says TIME media critic James Poniewozik. Read More...

Julia Child

Julia Child was more than a great cook. She changed both television and the culture of cooking. Read More...

TV set

Netflix's Chief Product Officer Neil Hunt and The New Yorker's Ken Auletta discuss the evolution of television and what scares cable companies the most. Read More...

Media Reporter Brian Stelter On The Future Of TV

What was the last television show your friends, family, or coworkers were buzzing about? Chances are, it wasn't on regular cable television. Brian Stelter, media reporter at the New York Times and author of Top of the Morning, says innovations in television programming and delivery may soon pull the plug on cable as we know it. If you've ever recoiled in horror at the sight of a hefty cable bill, you're not alone - and you may have other options. Companies like Apple, Google, and Amazon have introduced devices that stream content directly from the Internet to your television, bypassing cable altogether. "They're putting Trojan horses in our living rooms," says Stelter, who says such devices could cut in on cable's sizable audience.

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