Peter Singer

Hands

1. Spending your days volunteering might be a waste of time. Princeton philosopher Peter Singer tells us about "effective altruism."

2. Algorithms can discriminate just like people. Seeta Pena Gangadharan of the London School of Economics explains how relying too much on math can be a bad thing.

3. You don’t know your best friend as well as you think. Nicholas Epley, author of “Mindwise,” looks at why we misunderstand even those closest to us.

Lots and lots of money.

What if the best way to help people isn’t volunteering at a soup kitchen… but instead, making a whole ton of money? Philosopher Peter Singer gives us a whole new perspective on altruism. Read More...

Self-interest and sharing.

1. More people would turn in their taxes if the government went ahead and filled out the forms for them. Richard Thaler, a behavioral economist, tells us the counterintuitive things he’s learned by studying our deeply irrational behavior. 

2. A militia in Iraq built a machine-gunning ground drone that they can control with a tablet. Former Air Force pilot Missy Cummings and author Peter Singer discuss the future of war and robotic conflict. 

3. There’s a way to see if the grass really is greener on the other side of the cubicle, without your boss ever finding out. Tom Leung, CEO of Poachable, explains the rise of the anonymous job hunt.

A global hawk drone

The basic components of human conflict may never change, but the way we fight certainly will. Peter Singer, a senior fellow at the New America Foundation, and Missy Cummings, director of Duke's Humans and Autonomy Lab, explain how developing technologies like robots and hacking are radically transforming the way America goes to war. Read More...

The USS Zumwalt in dry dock.

From unmanned drones to bomb disposal, robots are steadily becoming an ever bigger part of the military. But drones aren’t the only way that automation is changing the way we fight. Read More...

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