health care

The innovations that have made our health care so effective also contribute to what makes it so expensive. MIT economist (who also helped build the Affordable Care Act) Jon Gruber says we should do a cost-benefit analysis on new drugs to keep costs low. Read more....

Spilled pills

Antibiotics are part of daily life, but overuse - and misuse - means we may soon face a time when they just don’t work. Read more...

Items found in the doctor's office

When it comes to reforming healthcare, lessons from the factory floor might just offer a cheaper solution. Read more...

EKG read out

Home pregnancy tests have been used for years – but in the near future we could be diagnosing dozens of diseases, from cancer to HIV, in the privacy of our own homes. Dr. Eugene Chan and Professor Andrew Ellington discuss what that means for doctors, patients, and health care costs. Read More...

doctor with tablet

Jon Gruber, the Director of the Health Care Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research, explains how little innovations might save trillions of health care dollars. Read More...

For years, the fight against polio was considered one of the most successful vaccination campaigns of all time. But now, the reappearance of the disease in countries like Pakistan, Syria, and Cameroon has thrown that success into jeopardy.  How was polio wiped out the first time around? Read more...

Brain MRI

Has technology fueled the healthcare crisis? Amitabh Chandra, Professor of Public Policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, explains the real - but often overlooked - reasons for our healthcare problems. Read More...

sugar

Put down that low-fat yogurt! Dr. Robert Lustig says that sugar - not fat - may be the real culprit behind America's obesity epidemic. Read more...

pills

When a pill costs more than the price of your house, is it really worth it? Barry Werth, author of "The Antidote," examines the astronomical costs of breakthrough drugs. Read more...

Is Jack Andraka the country's most famous high school student? We talk with the 15-year old winner of the Intel Science Talent Search, who developed an early means of detecting one of the world's deadliest cancers. Read more...

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