advertising

Dark money, microbes, oppressive ads, and overconfidence. It’s this week’s Innovation Hub. Read More...

Buy this! Drink that! Does it ever feel like advertisements are becoming more and more omnipresent? Author Tim Wu explains. Read more....

Advertisements in Times Square, NYC

The days of passive consumers are long gone. If advertisers want to engage today’s audiences, they need to create shareable experiences, say Thinkmodo co-founder James Percelay and advertising professor Edward Boches. Read More...

Nielsen sheet

TV shows live and die by Nielsen ratings, but does their data still matter in a Netflix world? It all depends on advertisers, says TIME media critic James Poniewozik. Read More...

DeBeers window display

In order to sell this everyday item, marketers mythologized it. And consumers happily paid excessive prices. What is it? Listen to find out. Read More...

Are ideas the new currency?

Let’s play a game — identify your dominant hand. Quickly snap your fingers five times with that hand. Now, take the forefinger on your dominant hand and draw a capital “E” on your forehead. Daniel Pink — recently named to the Strategic Advisory Council of outplacement services company RiseSmart — calls this game “The E Test.” It’s been used since the 1980s to measure what social scientists call “perspective-taking.” The results can give us insight into your worldview — do you see things strictly from your own perspective, or do you take the views of others into account?

Are our tastes converging on the biggest superstars and blockbusters?

Do you ever wonder why so many movies now have a number at the end? Superman 3, Batman 5, Fast and Furious 1, 2, 3, 4...(we could go on.) Anita Elberse, professor at Harvard Business School, certainly did. In her new book, Blockbusters: Hit-making, Risk-taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment, Elberse argues that, despite living in a world with more media sources and entertainment options than ever, our tastes are converging on the flashiest blockbuster hits and the biggest superstars.

Lars Albright, CEO of SessionM.

How do creative people cope with setbacks? Lars Albright, former Apple executive and CEO of SessionM, a loyalty platform for mobile applications, says the road to success isn't always a straight shot.

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